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Top News

  • Just two weeks left to upgrade to CrimsonCard; deadline is June 30

    On June 30, current IU School of Medicine identification cards will be deactivated, denying access to IU buildings. All IU School of Medicine students, faculty, staff and affiliates, including residents and fellows, must obtain a CrimsonCard, IU’s university-wide identification card, by June 30.

    How to obtain your CrimsonCard

    Indianapolis: In addition to getting a CrimsonCard, those in Indianapolis with current card access to IU Health facilities must transfer their existing access permissions to their new card. Replacing your current ID and transferring IU Health access to your CrimsonCard is a multi-step process and may take more than a week to complete.

    Also note:

    1. Keep your current IU School of Medicine ID/JagTag until you have confirmed that access to IU Health buildings has been successfully transferred. Due to the number of IU constituents requesting access transfer as the June 30 deadline approaches, the transfer could take more than a week. You may need to maintain two cards for a period of time: a CrimsonCard to enter IU buildings, and your old IU ID to access IU Health facilities.
    2. IU Health access transfer requests prior to June 30 should be for existing permissions only. New IU Health access requests should not be included as part of your CrimsonCard conversion and must be managed and approved through the standard channels.
    3. Access transfer requests should be submitted to IU Health via email through this process. This is the quickest and most reliable way to execute the transfer.

    Bloomington: Bring your current IU ID (or a government-issued ID) to a CrimsonCard office, Indiana Memorial Union M090 (main level) or Learning Commons 106. When obtaining your CrimsonCard, be sure to tell the card representative you need the IU School of Medicine multi-function card (also called the triple-technology card). Walk-in hours for Bloomington card offices are available.

    Northwest-Gary: Bring your current IU ID (or a government-issued ID) to the CrimsonCard office, Hawthorn 108. When obtaining your CrimsonCard, be sure to tell the card representative you need the IU School of Medicine multi-function card (also called the triple-technology card). Walk-in hours for the Hawthorn card office are available.

    Multi-function CrimsonCards for students, faculty and staff at all other IU School of Medicine campuses have been delivered.

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  • Medical student creates national organization connecting the LGBTQ+ community with health care providers

    Class of 2018 alumnus, Dustin Nowaskie, MD, co-founded OutCare while a medical student at IU School of Medicine. Outcare started as a database for LGBTQ health care, connecting LGBTQ+ patients with culturally competent health care providers. Now, OutCare is a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Learn more about how Dr. Nowaskie helped bring OutCare to fruition.

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  • IU School of Medicine faculty join governor at infant mortality bill signing

    Three IU School of Medicine faculty members joined Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb as he signed a new infant mortality bill into law earlier this month. Mary Abernathy, MD, David Boyle, MD, and Brownsyne Tucker Edmonds, MD, MPH, MS, were present at the signing of the bill, which establishes a statewide maternal mortality review committee. Senate Enrolled Act 142, sponsored by State Senator Jean Leising, requires a health care provider or health care facility to report maternal mortality-related deaths to the committee. The law also allows the Indiana State Department of Health to review morbidity rates.

    Indiana’s current maternal mortality rate of 41.4 is twice the national average and is higher than the rates of neighboring states, with Illinois at 16.6, Kentucky at 19.4, Michigan at 19.4 and Ohio at 20.3.

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  • Upcoming I-65 closure will affect downtown travel starting in July

    Travel to and from IU School of Medicine offices, IUPUI and downtown IU Health facilities will likely be more challenging this summer when Interstate 65 closes for 35 days sometime between July 1 and Aug. 5. As the Indiana Department of Transportation rehabilitates bridges along a stretch of I-65, the West Street entry and exit ramps to and from campus will not be accessible during the construction. Roadway improvements led by the city of Indianapolis also will impact travel in and around the IUPUI campus.

    Information about alternative routes and a PDF map of the affected area are available. Drivers are also encouraged to follow @INDOTEast on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to stay informed.

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  • Reminder: Office of Visual Media has relocated to HITS Building

    The IU School of Medicine Office of Visual Media, previously located in Emerson Hall, has a new home in in the Health Information and Translational Sciences (HITS) building. Pick up all posters and other project orders at the following address: 

    IU School of Medicine
    Office of Visual Media
    410 W. 10th Street, Suite 0030 (Lower Level)
    Indianapolis, IN 46202

    With questions or for additional information, email vismedia@iupui.edu.

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  • Next issue of INScope is June 28

    As a reminder, INScope is currently publishing on a bi-weekly summer schedule. The next issue is Thursday, June 28, with weekly issues resuming on Aug. 9. In July, INScope will be distributed on the following Thursdays:

    July 12
    July 26 

    The deadline for news item submissions is Wednesday at noon for each Thursday’s issue. For more information, visit the INScope page on MedNet. Email news submissions to scopemed@iu.edu.

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Research News

  • New study finds many pregnant women are exposed to potentially harmful herbicide

    A recent study by Indiana University School of Medicine, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Franciscan Health and the University of California, San Francisco shows many pregnant women are exposed to a potentially harmful chemical used on crops across the Midwest. Now, the team is conducting a larger study to answer more questions about how people are being exposed.

    “We don’t know what the actual risks and dangers are at this point, but this is a red flag that indicates we really need to look at this a lot closer,” said Jill Reiter, PhD, assistant professor with the IU School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    The team wanted to find out how many pregnant women are exposed to glyphosate, a chemical in Roundup used to kill weeds. They also wanted to know what the risk factors of that exposure were. Glyphosate is used by homeowners on yards and farmers on crops across the United States, but especially in the Midwest and Indiana on corn and soybeans. Since it first debuted in the ‘90s, the chemical has been used more each year and is now the most heavily used herbicide worldwide.

    “It’s been in use for two decades, but hardly anything is published on the health effects in humans,” said Shahid Parvez, PhD, an assistant professor with the IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health. “That’s why we decided to look at this chemical and came up with this study.”

    The team studied 71 pregnant women in central Indiana ages 18-40. The women filled out a survey and provided a urine sample. The researchers found 93 percent had detectable levels of glyphosate.

    “The women who had higher levels of glyphosate had shorter-term pregnancies,” said Dr. Reiter. “Shorter pregnancies could impact the baby’s long-term health. 

    Read more about the study in the IU School of Medicine Blogs Hub.

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Faculty and Staff News

  • Remembering Brian Decker, MD, PharmD

    Brian Decker, MD, PharmD, associate professor of clinical medicine, passed away on June 6 after a courageous two-year battle with sarcoma. Dr. Decker joined the IU School of Medicine faculty in 2007 in the divisions of nephrology and clinical pharmacology. While a faculty member, he completed a clinical pharmacology fellowship and a master’s degree in clinical research. Board certified in nephrology, clinical pharmacology and hypertension, Dr. Decker became the nephrology fellowship training program director in 2015. He was an avid teacher of pharmacology and pharmacogenomics to trainees from both IU and Purdue.

    In addition to mentoring nephrology student interest groups, Dr. Decker was a member of the IU Academy of Teaching Scholars Committee, the NBME Pharmacology test writing committee and the education committee for the American College of Clinical Pharmacology. He also served as chair of the medical advisory board of the National Kidney Foundation of Indiana. Dr. Decker was a lifelong mentor to Boy Scouts, serving as head scoutmaster, and also earned a black belt in Tae Kwon Do. 

    “Brian always loved teaching and mentoring and fostered the potential for excellence in everyone,” said Sharon Moe, MD, who worked closely with Dr. Decker in the nephrology department. “He was a great friend to many and selfless in his volunteerism. He will be greatly missed.”

    A multi-faith celebration of life honoring Dr. Decker will be held at 11 am, Saturday, June 16, at St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, 100 W. 86th St., Indianapolis. Following the celebration, there will be a light luncheon for fellowship with Brian’s wife Peggy and sons Noah and Scott.

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  • Faculty participate in national panel to discuss addiction management education

    IU School of Medicine faculty participated in a discussion panel that focused on developing better education programs on pain and addiction management for health care trainees and practitioners. Comprised of representatives from 29 medical schools, the panel recently convened at Brown University and was led by Vivek Murthy, former U.S. Surgeon General. Bradley Allen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for medical student education; Palmer McKie, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine; and Camila Arnaudo, MD, lecturer in clinical psychiatry, represented IU School of Medicine at the discussion.

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  • Apply for LAMP by June 29

    The Leadership in Academic Medicine Program (LAMP) is a cohort-based, yearlong faculty development and orientation program designed for faculty in the second and third years of their appointment. Prospective participants should submit a brief statement of support from their chair or division director no later than Friday, June 29. Once nominated, applicants will submit a one-page document describing career goals to be accomplished in the next three years. More information and application guidelines are available.

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Student News

  • Don’t forget: Take the Mentoring and Advising Program (MAP) survey by June 30

    The annual IU School of Medicine Mentoring and Advising Program (MAP) survey is now available. Based on feedback gathered from past MAP surveys, the school has made a number of significant improvements in mentoring and advising services. The survey will close on Sunday, June 30.

    Take the survey now.

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  • New officers elected for South Bend student outreach clinic

    Several IU School of Medicine-South Bend students were recently elected to lead the Navari Student Outreach Clinic:

    Katie Dorsett, president
    Jordan Jones, director of operations
    Stef Vande Lune, chair of finance
    Tristan Van Voorhis, chair of research and education
    Mat Marsee, chair of public relations
    Josh Mifflin, chair of patient communications

    Led by IU School of Medicine-South Bend student and faculty volunteers, the clinic focuses on delivering high-quality care to uninsured and underserved members of the South Bend community, while also enriching the educational experience of medical students.

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Opportunities

  • Submit an abstract and register by June 29 for annual diabetes symposium

    The IU School of Medicine Center for Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases is hosting its fourth annual diabetes symposium on Friday, Aug. 3.  Each year, the symposium introduces attendees to novel ideas, discoveries and trends related to diabetes, metabolism, obesity and more. This year's event will emphasize clinical research. Attendees will hear from keynote speakers Sonia Michael Majjar, MS, PhD, and Louis Phillipson, MD, PhD, as well as IU School of Medicine's vast internal network of experts. 

    Event registration and abstract submission are open through Friday, June 29. Visit the Diabetes Symposium event page for details.

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  • Cancer biology training program accepting applications through July 6

    The Translational Cancer Biology Training Program (TCBTP) is designed to enhance the training received in any individual laboratory or department. Trainees are exposed to a broad range of cancer-related research encompassing both basic and clinical aspects of the disease. TCBTP predoctoral students fulfill the requirements of their individual basic science departments and complete a cancer biology minor. Pre-doctoral CBTP trainees attend both a basic science and a clinical seminar series, co-sponsored by the IU Simon Cancer Center and participate in the IU Simon Cancer Center's annual Cancer Research Day. 

    TCBTP stipends are available on a competitive basis for trainees conducting their research in the laboratory of a TCBTP preceptor. Candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. More information is available. Email Harikrishna Nakshatri, PhD, at hnakshat@iupui.edu with questions. Application deadline is Friday, July 6.

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  • Apply by July 26 for CTR pilot grant program

    The objective of the Indiana CTSI Collaboration in Translational Research (CTR) pilot grant program is to foster and encourage collaborations across the CTSI partner institutions and initiate or continue translational research projects that have very strong and immediate potential to develop into larger, externally funded research programs or generate novel intellectual property. Applications are evaluated on the quality of the proposed science, as well as the application’s strength in clarifying the plan for leveraging the award toward the achievement of the primary CTR objectives. Eligibility criteria and more information are available. Deadline to apply is Thursday, July 26. Questions? Email icreate@iu.edu.

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  • Sign up for summer EndNote courses

    Summer courses are now available for EndNote—a citation management software program that allows users to import citations from numerous literature databases into one spot. Users can then edit citations, add notes, import full text documents and use the program to format citations for articles, papers, grant proposals and more. Learn more during these courses:

    Wednesday, June 27; 3:30-4:30 pm
    Wednesday, July 25; 3:30-4:30 pm 

    Both courses will be held in the Ruth Lilly Medical Library, Room IB 227. For more information, email Rick Ralston at rralston@iu.edu or call 317-274-1409.

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  • Aug. 30 Mark Brothers Lecture to focus on genome editing

    Feng Zhang, PhD, professor of neuroscience at MIT, will present the Mark Brothers Lecture, “Genome Editing: Development and Applications,” at 3 pm, Thursday, Aug. 30. The Mark Brothers Award was established in 1997 in honor of Dr. Guey C. Mark’s older brothers, who emigrated from Canton, China, and settled in South Bend, Indiana, where they built a successful restaurant business. Because of their reverence and respect for higher education, Dr. Mark's brothers supported his pursuit of a career in medicine. Registration and more information are available.

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Partner News

  • IU Health forms suburban region

    As part of continued investment in medical facilities and clinical programs in Indianapolis’ suburban areas, Indiana University Health has officially created an Indianapolis Suburban Region to include its four suburban hospitals (IU Health North, West, Saxony and Tipton hospitals) and any future expansion the hospital system may consider in the south and east areas of Indianapolis.

    Doug Puckett, president, IU Health West Hospital, will serve as president of IU Health Indianapolis Suburban Region. A new regional executive leadership team comprised of the presidents of IU Health North and West hospitals, along with the chief medical, nursing and transformation officers in the region, has also been formed. This team will oversee and coordinate activity among the hospitals and associated medical facilities to ensure strategic alignment with the system. The team also will drive collaboration within the region to build robust service lines, gain operational efficiencies and continue the development of world class patient-focused programs.

    In addition, newly appointed presidents of IU Health North and West Suburban Areas, as well as a new vice president of regional development and planning, will report directly to Puckett:

    • Alicia Schulhof, FACHE, has been named president, IU Health North Suburban Area, which includes responsibility for IU Health North, Saxony and Tipton hospitals. Schulhof previously served as senior vice president, continuous improvement.
    • Arthur Vasquez has been appointed president, IU Health West Suburban Area. He was previously chief financial officer and chief operating officer for IU Health West Hospital.
    • Randall Yust has been named vice president, regional development and planning. Previously, Yust was chief financial officer and chief operating officer for the North Central Region.  

    In a June 7 message, IU Health leaders said the new Indianapolis Suburban Region business unit will be an important contributor to fueling the system’s long-term growth. With the hospital expansion at IU Health West and the new cancer care unit at IU Health North, the region will be a leader in adopting new models of care for patients and providers.

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  • Dennis Murphy, IU Health president and CEO discusses health care trends

    Building Indiana newsletter recently asked area health system executives, including IU Health President and CEO Dennis Murphy, to weigh in on “trends that reshape the way patients receive treatment in the state” and how new facilities, technologies and methods “impact hospital administration and the business side of health care.”

    In a column, Murphy wrote, “Transformative times in healthcare are driving fundamental changes at Indiana University Health, from the design of hospitals to customized care provided to each patient.” He also detailed IU Health’s solutions to providing the best patient care, including leading-edge technology, convenience and a partnership with IU School of Medicine.

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Kudos

  • Carmella Evans-Molina, MD, PhD, joins nPOD as co-executive director

    Carmella Evans-Molina, MD, PhD, the J.O. Ritchey Scholar in Medicine, recently joined the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes (nPOD) program as co-executive director. In this position, Evans-Molina will work with nPOD to improve scientific understanding of the development of Type 1 diabetes by maintaining a network of pancreata and related tissues from cadaveric organ donors with Type 1 diabetes and those who are islet antibody positive. With these resources, nPOD allows investigators to collaborate and address key immunological, histological, viral and metabolic questions related to the development of Type 1 diabetes.

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  • Gold Foundation award named in honor of Richard Frankel, PhD

    The Arnold P. Gold Foundation Research Institute recently created the Richard Frankel Award for Creating a Loving Community, in recognition of the contributions and achievements of Richard Frankel, PhD, professor of medicine and Regenstrief Institute investigator. Frankel is internationally respected for his contributions and achievements in fostering humanism in medical education, practice and research and also played a significant role in establishing the Mapping the Landscape, Journeying Together initiative of the Gold Foundation Research Institute. 

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  • Moanaro Biswas, PhD, is recipient of career development award

    Moanaro Biswas, PhD, is the 2018 recipient of the National Hemophilia Foundation/NovoNordisk Career Development Award. Dr. Biswas recently joined the IU School of Medicine faculty as a research assistant professor with the new Gene and Cell Therapy Program at the Wells Center for Pediatric Research. 

    The NHF/NovoNordisk Career Development Award includes funding in the amount of $70,000 per year for the next three years. Biswas will use these funds to pursue her research of engineered regulatory T cell therapy for tolerance to FVIII. Her research focuses on the development of tolerance to clotting factor replacement therapy for hemophilia. She is interested in cell-based immunotherapies using engineered, antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs). The ultimate goal of her research is to understand immune modulation at the cellular level and use her findings to develop primary or adjunct therapeutics.

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  • Doctoral candidate Sarah Peck earns international award from Thermo Scientific

    Sarah Peck, IU School of Medicine doctoral candidate in biochemistry and molecular biology, is the bronze-level winner of the fourth annual Thermo Scientific Tandem Mass Tag Research Award. This is the first year Thermo Scientific has accepted award applications from postdocs and graduate students with Peck the only graduate student selected among four award winners. 

    Peck is a graduate student in the lab of Amber Mosley, PhD, in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The Mosley lab uses both proteomic and genomic approaches to study the regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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