Feds select IUSM to lead Midwest portion of national clinical-transformation program

October 1, 2015

The Indiana University School of Medicine will lead a four-year, $46.4 million federally-funded project to support 11,500 physicians, advance practice providers and clinical pharmacists in Indiana, Illinois and Michigan to facilitate the transformation of their practices in providing the triple aim of better health and better care at lower costs.

IUSM is one 29 organizations to receive funding as part of the $685 million Transforming Clinical Practices Initiative | Photo By IU School of Medicine

The Great Lakes Practice Transformation Network, led by Malaz A. Boustani, chief operating officer of the Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science at the IU School of Medicine, is a coalition of 33 partners including the three states' health departments and eight universities, among others.

The Great Lakes network is one of just 29 organizations to receive funding as part of the $685 million Transforming Clinical Practices Initiative created to help drive changes in the practice of medicine by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

"Our healthcare system is rapidly changing. In order to deliver improved value to our patients, we need to support our clinicians in their journey of improving patient care while driving down costs. The Great Lakes Practice Transformation Network will provide clinicians with personalized and locally sensitive tools needed to accomplish this," said Dr. Boustani, Richard M. Fairbanks Professor of Aging Research and professor of medicine at IU Center for Aging Research.

"Our network will deploy quality improvement advisors to support clinicians in their transformation journey. This journey will provide high value and personalized care for 10 million people in the three states and reduce inappropriate hospitalization, emergency department visits, and unnecessary testing. Such high valued care will produce $1 billion in cost savings for federal government spending on Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance program," he said.

At the heart of the project, the network will train 52 quality improvement advisors to coach the 11,500 clinicians on patient-centered transformation of their practices, incorporating three key approaches:

  • Implementation science to develop tools, process and strategies for rapid implementation of evidence based medicine into the local real world.

  • Lean and Six Sigma process improvement tools.

  • Patient-centric, personalized population health management.The network will focus on implementing evidence-based practices and evidence-based management to improve care for high blood pressure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, depression and diabetes management amongst other clinical areas.

The operations of the network will be led by Nadia Adams, executive director of the Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science at the IU School of Medicine. Adams will work with the board of directors to execute the overall strategies. Each state will have a localized operations team overseeing daily activities of the program, supported by a central consortium of faculty experts in such fields as preventive health, chronic disease management and pediatrics health services research. There will also be a stakeholders advisory board including patient and family representatives from each state.

To learn more about the Transforming Clinical Practices Initiative and its supporting networks, visit the CMS.gov website.